ESSENTIAL CAREGIVER PROGRAM – JULY 24, 2020 UPDATE

Hello St. William’s Living Center and McCornell Court Resident, Friends, and Family,

We are pleased to announce that we are creating a new program called Essential Caregiver – in accordance with guidelines released from Minnesota Department of Health (MDH). Our goal through this program is to help our residents who are missing care previously provided by a loved one or outside caregiver prior to the visitor restrictions required by state and federal guidelines due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The policy follows MDH guidelines and is a narrowly defined exception to visitor restrictions which may allow certain cares to be provided by a personal caregiver from outside our community. This new guidance is not intended to be a reopening of visitors, but instead is intended to provide essential care for high risk residents.

Below are some of the criteria we will use as we evaluate and designate Essential Caregivers in our settings:

  • Essential Caregivers will be determined based on consultation/assessment with our interdisciplinary team.  Residents will be consulted about their wishes to help determine whom to designate as an Essential Caregiver.
  • Essential Caregivers will be actively screened for symptoms of COVID-19 prior to entering the building and must wear all necessary personal protective equipment while in the building. They must also perform frequent hand hygiene and maintain social distancing of at least 6 feet with staff and other residents while in our building.
  • Essential Caregivers will limit their movement in our building, providing care and support in their loved ones’ room or a designated space in our building.
  • Essential Caregivers must inform us if they develop a fever or symptoms consistent with COVID-19 within 14 days of a visit to a resident.

With this new guidance, it is important to know that Essential Caregivers cannot take a resident out into the community except for essential medical appointments and must not visit a resident during a resident’s 14-day quarantine and must not visit when a resident is positive for COVID-19 or symptomatic, unless the visit is for compassionate care.  Please know we do retain the right to restrict or revoke Essential Care status if the designated person fails to follow our established policies and protocols. 

If, at any time, it is deemed unsafe for Essential Caregivers to enter the building—due to a rise in the number of cases in our community, either within our walls or in the broader community—it is our obligation per MDH guidelines to revisit and reassess the program.

We recognize the concern you may have that not everyone will be able to serve as an Essential Family Caregiver. We also deeply feel the desire of our residents and their loved ones to be connected in a more meaningful way.

Please know we continue to provide outdoor visits, window visits, and visits through technology and encourage you to take advantage of these opportunities.

Michelle Hartmann, our Social Services Director, will be the main contact for the Essential Care Program.  Michelle can be reached at 218-338-1008.

Sincerely,

Tim Kelly

Administrator

St. William’s Living Center

St. William’s Living Center Outdoor Visitation Policy:

Visitors should call activity department at 218-338-1010 to schedule an appointment.  Appointments must be scheduled for outdoor visits.  If activity staff are not available, visitors should leave a message and staff will return the phone call.  Families are encouraged to give as much advance notice for staff and residents to prepare for the visit.  Visits will be scheduled in half hour time slots, which will allow for a 20-minute visit.  This will allow staff time to assist residents to get to and from their assigned visit.  Longer visits will be taken into consideration for special circumstances.  Visitation hours are based on staff availability. 

Current COVID-19 positive residents, residents with COVID-19 signs or symptoms, and residents in a 14-day quarantine or observation period are not eligible for outside visits.

One staff person should be assigned to each resident for the duration of the visit.  Staff should maintain visual observation but provide as much distance as necessary to allow for privacy of the visit conversation.

Visitors must be screened by staff prior to the visit.  Staff should use the visitor log to gather contact information and document screening questions.  Temperatures of visitors must be taken.  Any visitor with a temperature of 100 or greater or any of the following symptoms will be asked to leave.  Screening questions include:

  • In the last 14 days, has had contact with someone with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID19, or under investigation for COVID-19, or are ill with respiratory illness.
  • Do you have a new fever (100 F or higher) or the sense of having a fever?
  • Do you have a new cough that you cannot attribute to another health condition?
  • Do you have a new shortness of breath that you cannot attribute to another health condition?
  • Do you have a new sore throat that you cannot attribute to another health condition?
  • Do you have new muscle aches that you cannot attribute to anther health condition or that may have been caused by a specific activity (such as physical exercise)?   

Residents and visitors must wear a mask or other face covering during the visit, as tolerated and must support social distancing of at least 6 feet between the visitor and resident.  If visitors do not have a mask, a cloth mask will be provided by the facility to use during the visit.

Due to the risk of exposure, holding hands, hugging, kissing, or other physical contact is not allowed during family visits.  Visitors under age 12 years must be in the control of adults who bring them and must also comply with social distancing requirements.  Pets must be under the control of the visitor bringing them in.

SWLC will provide alcohol-based hand rub to persons visiting residents and staff will provide verbal reminders of correct use.

Weather: Visits should occur only on days when there are no weather warnings that would put either the visitor or resident at risk.

St. William’s Living Center retains the right to deny outdoor visitation to specific residents only if they believe:

1. Circumstances pose a risk of transmitting COVID-19 to the facility because the resident or visitor does not comply with infection control guidance, or

2. The resident or visitor is at risk of abuse/harm.

Is It True? Common Misinformation About the Coronavirus Outbreak

We are fortunate to live in a time when we don’t have to wait for the morning paper for our news. It’s easy to get the breaking news we need through twenty-four-hour cable news outlets, social media, and the internet.

This fast news cycle has its drawbacks too. Misinformation about the Coronavirus outbreak tends to get spread around just as quickly as facts. Sometimes, even legitimate news sources make mistakes in their reporting and spread misinformation about this deadly disease.

In this article, we’ll address some of the recent pieces of misinformation floating around out there. We’ll also tell you what you can believe during these uncertain times.

Recently Reported Misinformation

The World Health Organization (WHO) recently made claims that asymptomatic spread, or spread of the disease by those who carry the virus yet exhibit no symptoms, is a rare occurrence. A day later, they went back on this claim and said that much is still unknown about asymptomatic spread.

In early June, the Star Tribune reported a story that grossly misrepresented the impact of the disease in the state’s long-term care facilities. The article miscounted death totals and made no mention of the measures taken to care for those with COVID-19.

Some of the facilities mentioned in the article opened up entire wings to the care of COVID-19 patients and have high recovery rates. This information was completely omitted from the original article and only a small correction printed in the next day’s paper.

There have also been many reports about how the virus spreads. In the initial stages of the outbreak, scientists believed the virus was spread by touching surfaces. Now, some news outlets are saying that it can’t be spread this way, rather, it spreads by being close to someone who has the virus.

The truth? It’s more complicated than these limited online stories cover.

What We Know About the Coronavirus Outbreak

The examples we’ve given in this article are just a few recent examples of misreporting on this topic. Let’s concentrate on what we know to be true at this time.

1. We Don’t Understand the Disease Yet

Despite all the information out there on COVID-19, scientists really don’t know much about it. From the beginning, we’ve operated assuming asymptomatic spread and surface spread are dangerous to our residents. Until we have hard, scientific facts about how the disease spreads, we plan to air on the side of caution to protect our vulnerable residents.

2. It Is Deadly to Our Residents

We might not have scientific data about the disease, but we do know one thing for sure – it is deadly to the elderly and to those with compromised immune systems. The statistics verify this as a fact and we need to continue diligent safety measures to protect the residents of St. William’s Living Center.

3. Masks DO Help

Wearing a cloth mask won’t necessarily prevent you from contracting the virus. However, wearing a mask does protect others if you happen to be a carrier of the virus or if you haven’t developed symptoms yet.

In fact, disposable masks are now readily available at many major stores and pharmacies. Disposable masks provide a better fit, which gives you more protection. They are also more comfortable to wear than heavy, cloth masks.

4. Testing Is Very Important

Testing is the best way to prevent outbreaks in long-term care facilities. By testing our residents and staff, we can identify those who carry the virus, even if they do not show symptoms. We can keep infected staff out of the building, and we can isolate infected residents to prevent further spread.

At this time, St. William’s has had no positive cases of COVID-19.

5. Excellent Hygiene Works to Prevent Outbreak

We know for certain that practicing excellent hygiene is the best way to stay safe during this pandemic. Wash your hands thoroughly and often. Avoid touching your face.

Use hand sanitizer throughout the day as an added precaution. Hand sanitizer is now readily available in most major stores. Buy a bottle to keep in your car and use it every time you return from a trip out. 

What We’re Doing to Keep Our Residents Safe

Our top priority is keeping our residents safe from a Coronavirus outbreak. All St. William’s staff wear surgical masks and protective eyewear while on duty. We are also screening all employees before they enter the building to ensure someone with symptoms doesn’t come to work and infect others.

We worked with the National Guard to complete three rounds of testing on all residents and staff members. So far, we have had no positive cases of Coronavirus at St. William’s.

We are well-stocked in personal protective equipment for our staff members and we have plenty of hand sanitizer and cleaning supplies on hand. Employees that develop COVID-like symptoms are immediately asked to leave work, consult their physician, and get tested before returning to work.

Residents who report symptoms are isolated in their room and immediately tested. If a resident tests positive, we’ve prepared a separate area of our facility to act as a COVID unit. That resident will be separated from healthy residents and only COVID designated staff will care for them. Healthy residents will never share space or staff with the COVID unit when that time comes.

St. William’s is strictly following all Minnesota Department of Health and Center for Disease Control guidelines. If you have questions or concerns, please call us.

COVID-19: Proactive Testing By National Guard at St. William’s Living Center

At St. William’s, we abide by one, simple rule: Provide the highest quality health care and services to seniors.

The rise of the recent COVID-19 pandemic is no exception to the rule. We refuse to allow this global catastrophe to compromise the quality of service we offer.

According to the Minnesota Department of Health, 82% of all COVID-19 deaths in our state were residents of long-term care or assisted living facilities. That chilling statistic puts us on high alert to protect our vulnerable residents.

We have had no positive cases of COVID-19 at our facility. Keep reading to learn the measures we’re taking at St. William’s to ensure the safety of our residents and employees.

Proactive Testing

The best way to mitigate the dangers of this disease is prevention. We’ve done this by following strict social distancing guidelines and practicing high levels of personal hygiene. But another important factor in preventing an outbreak is testing.

The State of Emergencies Operations Center (SEOC) in collaboration with the Minnesota National Guard are making a plan to test all long-term care residents and employees throughout the state. They will be at St. William’s on the following dates:

  • May 29, 2020
  • June 5, 2020
  • June 11, 2020

National Guard members will be on-site during those days to test all residents and staff. This is great news because it will help us in our fight to keep St. William’s free from COVID-19.

Extra Precautions

Infection prevention has always been one of our top priorities, but since the outbreak, we have taken more proactive measures to isolate and prevent the spread. Visitation remains restricted until further notice. We have also restricted all communal dining and activities, instead opting for activities that residents can do from their rooms including traveling happy hour and daily movies.

All St. William’s staff members wear masks during their shifts and direct care staff members also wear protective goggles. Our supplies of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) are healthy as we have large numbers of masks, gowns, and eye protection on hand. We also have ample amounts of cleaning and sanitation supplies.

Employees are screened for COVID-19 symptoms at the beginning of each shift. Residents are also screened twice per day to detect symptoms early.

In a proactive move, we have hired plenty of extra staff members so we can continue to provide the highest quality of care for our residents as the pandemic reaches new heights. We have also been in contact with a nurse staffing agency should staffing levels drop due to infections.

Plan for the Future

Again, there have been no positive cases at St. Williams and our goal is to keep it that way. However, we must remain realistic. As this disease spreads and the economy opens again, we will see positive cases rise and it will impact our residents and staff members.

If we do have a resident test positive for the disease, we have an action plan to care for them until they are no longer contagious. We have been following the Minnesota Department of Health guidelines and our staff members are well-versed in the proper infection control procedures. We will take swift action to ensure the disease doesn’t spread and that the resident gets the best care possible while they recover.

Family members, residents, and staff will be updated immediately if a positive test result occurs at St. William’s.

To Our Staff Members

St. William’s wouldn’t be the exceptional facility it is without our amazing staff members. Over the last few months, they have been especially important as they are at the front lines of this pandemic, caring for those who are the most vulnerable.

Wearing a face mask and eye protection every day is a burden. Taking multiple tests to rule out infection is a burden. Dealing with the stress of the pandemic while continuing to care for others is a burden.

Our staff has handled these burdens with exceptional poise and we are greatly appreciative of every one of them!

Questions? Give Us a Call

At this time, St. William’s has no positive cases of COVID-19 and we plan to do everything we can to keep it that way. If you have any questions about how we’re dealing with this crisis, please feel free to contact us: Tim Kelly, Administrator at 218-338-1001, or Lori Roers, Director of Nursing at 218-338-1009.

Going Backwards may Help Us Go Forward

With COVID-19, many have been forced to return in some format to the customs of previous generations; without access to outings, social visiting or even money to purchase types of entertainment devices.    Is there any silver lining in going backwards? 

According to experts in the mental health field, the lives many of us lead today show more anxiety and depression compared to 50 years ago.  Back a generation or two, children used to play outside games, such as “Annie Annie Over” where two groups of kids on the opposite side threw a ball over the house to the kids on the other side. The goal was to tag the person catching the ball, or catch the ball and tag someone from the opposite side.  It is a simple game; one without much pizzazz, but fun none-the-less.  In contrast to today’s rapid pace and techy world, kids back then stayed home more and shared hours of creative playtime, be it dress-up, “Kick the Can”, Tag, Hop Scotch, marbles, or Chinese Jump-Rope.  Yes, this is the generation that ranked high to smelling the flowers and having neighbors over for Sunday afternoon get-togethers.  These happy-go-lucky times are of a simpler world which has nearly passed us by.

With time, we have become more multifaceted beings.  Our society has given way to the technical world and the rapid pace of it all, with expectations higher and the competition greater.  Our brains have stretched to saturate more and more advanced data of which we strive to understand so that we can function in today’s world.   As we are in a progressive generation that requires the mastery of such operandum, we become accustomed to a fast-paced, complicated operational culture. 

We all are adjusting to a new normal; one that allows for more pause and breathing space, giving way to waning schedules and tasks mostly limited to home projects.  Maybe this is a time for reflection on the lives we live.  What would be the silver lining in all this?  Maybe there is some benefit to taking a wider lens to a fast-paced lifestyle while also being homebound and forced to live more simply.  Could it be that we come to a new truism about the lifestyle we choose once this virus is behind us?  While we capture ourselves in an advanced era, maybe we will seek a new balance; one that supports good mental health.  Truly, relaxing is a necessary key to reducing our mental health symptoms while also reducing chronic pain and improving your overall physical health.  As we have become consumed with the fast pace of this generation, it is doubtful that our kids will learn “Annie Annie Over”.  However, possibly we all will come to see that taking a breath, slowing down or just settling is a good thing.  Going backwards may help us move forwards.  

Claudia A. Liljegren, MSW, LICSW

The Pathway Through Uncertain Times

Who would have thunk it?  Most of us have never experienced anything like COVID 19.  As many of us in our country, even throughout the world, have been obstructed and disturbed by several gigantic turbulences in their lives (e.g., world wars, gigantic volcano eruptions, drastic ups and downs of financial markets), this is unique.  A virus?  Impacting the entire world?  Yes, we haven’t experienced anything like this in our life time, although history shows that we have gone this way before.  Most of us have felt the crunch that has taken place along the way; and without a certainty of what’s best next, we each have a choice as to what path forward we will take.  There are many paths, yet we all must ask ourselves which one will lead us to the best one.

What path will you take?  When people become anxious or stressed, it is common to react with either/or a mixture of “flight, fight or freeze”.  These are the common responses to anxiety. 

What is “flight”?  It is running away from it all.  The hype of the virus becomes so overwhelming and unstoppable that it can’t be reckoned with.   As emotions of anxiety or fear reach a new height, logic may not be at the forefront and running away is the primary mode of operation.

“Fight” is another pathway some follow.  Here, the emotions of anger/blame come forward.  It is an effort to ensure there is justice or that those in authority be held accountable for poor leadership.  The individual finds justification through efforts at opposition with feelings of being wronged.   Again, emotions run the show and finding the path may be secondary.

“Freeze” is a reaction oftentimes felt by those who are stunned or shocked with the trauma and their emotions paralyze them so that moving forwards or backwards is not considered.  Panic is the primary emotion, and staying still without a course of action is common-place.

Emotions have a hay-day with disturbances we have to face, such as this virus.  We can allow our emotions; like anxiety or fear or anger/blame or guilt, to guide us down a path that allows our passion or reactions to lead. 

We can also allow our own biases or personality traits to dominate our choice of paths, be it burying your head in the sand with a sei la vie’ attitude, fighting for power or control, reacting with a sense of being victimized and dependency, or sharing a full force of drama.

Resilience is a path that oftentimes is left forgotten.  Resilience allows for a brighter ending – being logical about the reality of the virus, appreciating the challenge of it all, seeking emotional and spiritual endurance, over-powering the temptation of reacting with raw emotion, and building inner strength may all be keys to finding the right path. 

Most of us believe that at some point we will return to a new normal but one we can accommodate with.  How are you going to get there?  In paraphrasing one author, “We all get off the train at the same time; but the experience of it all is up to us”.  Indeed, these are uncertain times.    Be aware of the path you choose.  

Claudia A. Liljegren, MSW, LICSW

Spring is in the Air, so COVID-19 Has to Share

No one can take away our spring!!  It is that time of year that we have long been waiting for; the warmth of the sun, the popping of greens, the airborne freshness and fragrance of the season – a delight to our souls. 

Being outdoors is a huge benefit to mental health.  For the most part, through COVID 19 and during this Minnesota’s late winter, we have become destined as indoor creatures. As our brains have attempted to survive isolation with these long cold days, many of us have turned to exploring and operating technological advances.   However, as time has gone on, many of us have sunk into the grasp of these operative systems.  We have lost control and now suffer with its innumerable phone calls, time warps with computer over-indulgence and extended TV/movie successions, and then there are the inundating  tagalongs of sequential advertisements from all over, paperwork, political inquiries, fund raising requests; and all sorts of overwhelming information.  What happens to the brain with all this chaos?  It becomes frazzled, or exhausted, or drained, and weary.  It sinks into an android-like state, quivering and drooling, and half-stumped over.  What does it need?  It needs the outdoors!!  Especially in the spring!!  Enough of this swarm to this technological magnet! 

Going outside seems to be a natural remedy.  It reduces mental fatigue and washes away stress, at least for a while.   In fact, just 20-30 minutes a day outside in nature can meaningfully reduce cortisol levels and lower your stress level.  Spending time in nature has also been shown to improve symptoms of depression or prevent it from occurring.  And, of course, there is the sun – the natural light that has been shown to be beneficial, not even to improved moods but now studies point to higher self-esteem, especially when combined with outside exercise.  Getting a breath of fresh air, being in the sun, feeling the warm breeze, watching the season of life begin again; a true stress-reliever! 

Yet, we have to share this spring with COVID-19!!  No parks or recreational areas are open, walking is done mostly in isolated places, and no scurrying about with others as we see distant masked faces looking away to avoid contamination.  So, how do we sustain our mental health with the disappointment of limited access to the air we breathe and the outdoors we cherish this time of year?  Well, like it or not, we bulldoze ourselves right through.  That’s how!!  There is room in the air for both!!   We draw up some plans to help us get through.  We find some ways to make it work.  We can’t ignore either the reality of COVID-19 and the need for good mental health by being outside.  This is a big world.  We can do both.  COVID-19 just needs to share ‘cuz spring is in the air and good mental health is a key!!

Claudia A. Liljegren, MSW, LICSW

Life as it Could be with COVID-19

As time passes, we become weighed in with the reality of it all.  This virus, as has been the case for so many contagions before us, could last for much longer than we had initially anticipated.  It may become a way of life for a while.  Working on managing the virus with social distancing, wearing masks/gloves, and being home-bound may be the beginning of a long process.  How do we move beyond interrupted anxiety about “what could happen?”; or lingering isolation with deepening loneliness and depression; or ongoing family or relationship conflicts with no individual space; or heightened stress about how to pay the bills or put food on the table?

How do we endure?  How do we use this time as a way to challenge ourselves with what we actually can change?  As well, how can we embrace our suffering so it doesn’t overcome us?  Indeed, it would be quite the challenge to allow ourselves to suffer without being run over by our negative thoughts and fears, much less the certainty of the realness of this crisis.  

What is it inside of us that brings ourselves to a sense of calm when the world is spinning around us?  Of course, it can be denying or minimizing the true effect of the spinning.  But beyond this, what characteristics or values or beliefs or vision does one hold to truly not give way to all of the chaos around us?

Is it a sense of who we are or how we define ourselves that makes a difference, or how we put together the real meaning of life?  Maybe a goal is to have an internal locus of control vs. reacting to what happens outside of ourselves.  Maybe it is redefining our purpose that drives us throughout our lifetime, regardless of the circumstances that befall upon us.  Maybe it is a time to turn in and look at what shapes our own principles or values, and sense of resolve, or true Faith beyond ourselves that gives us resolution?     Maybe that is what will help us endure – coming back to our roots; asking ourselves what life is supposed to be all about.  Maybe that is the way we can challenge ourselves with what we can actually change – a sense of serenity during a time of chaos.

Claudia A. Liljegren, MSW, LICSW

Need a Job During COVID-19? Consider Working at a Nursing Home

How has the COVID-19 pandemic affected you and your family?

The answer to this question is often complicated. Many of us find ourselves out of work and unable to leave our homes or visit with family and friends.

Isolation is difficult for many people to deal with, and losing your only source of income can put added stress into an already stressful situation. Fortunately, we’ve got an answer to both of these problems.

Keep reading to learn why you should consider working at a nursing home.

Top-Notch Pay and Perks

At St. William’s Living Center, we offer competitive pay and an excellent benefits package. During this pandemic, you don’t need the added stress of worrying about health care coverage for you and your family. At St. William’s we offer affordable health insurance to our employees including options for dental and vision coverage.

Our employees receive paid time off (PTO) which begins accruing on the day you start work. We also offer every employee a life insurance policy and we contribute to retirement accounts. If you’re considering moving up in the nursing field, we offer scholarships to continue your education and further your career.

Healthcare Jobs are Recession-Proof

One worrisome aspect of the global pandemic is not knowing what will happen with the economy. Fortunately for healthcare workers, our jobs are normally recession-proof. No matter what the economy looks like at the end of this pandemic, there will always be a need for people to take care of others.

With the threat of COVID-19 looming, it’s more important than ever that we have a full staff at St. William’s. By ensuring we have plenty of healthy workers to take care of our residents, we can prevent coronavirus infections and ultimately save lives.

Lots of Available Opportunities

You don’t have to be experienced or have an advanced degree to work at the nursing home. We currently have openings for housekeeping, resident support, dietary aides, and cooks. These openings are both part-time and full-time and we have temporary or permanent work options available.

If you’re interested in starting a new career in the nursing industry, we will help you get started by registering you for classes to become a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA). If you already have a degree, we’re actively looking for Licensed Practical Nurses (LPNs) and mental health workers.

Make a Difference In Your Community

Helping others in the community is an excellent way to keep up morale. If you’ve lost your job because of COVID-19, working at the nursing home might be just what you need to stay healthy and active. There’s never a boring day when you’re caring for others.

You’ll know at the end of the day, you made a difference in the lives of some of the most vulnerable people in our society. That’s a great feeling!

Start a Rewarding Career Working at a Nursing Home

Whether you’re looking for temporary work or a career change, working at a nursing home is an option for you! At St. William’s Living Center, we care about our residents and employees first and foremost, and we’re doing everything we can to keep everyone safe and happy.

Visit our Careers Page today to find out what jobs are available and how to apply. We’re always here to answer questions, so feel free to call us anytime!

Seniors Facing COVID-19

Putting yourself in the seat of a senior, what would it feel like to be constantly reminded about the fear of contracting COVID-?  While facing the reality that grave illness or death for themselves or their friends may be just around the corner, the curve of anxiety takes a steep turn upwards.  Not only is the mind turning various possibilities of “What if’s”, they are also more prone to constant worrying, sleeping and eating problems, concentration difficulties, increased irritability and frustration, and likely fear the worst-case scenarios – all symptoms of clinical anxiety; and all normal in the face of a pandemic. 

On top of this, seniors, as is the case for most Americans, are authorized to isolate themselves or practice social distancing during the course of this virus.  Overall, seniors struggle significantly more with isolation compared to the general population.   As isolation persists as a constant, loneliness oftentimes begets depression.   Being alone can be debilitating, with a high suicide rate among those over 65, noting that 18% of all suicide deaths are from the elderly population.  Depression among the elderly oftentimes shows itself with common symptoms, including staying in bed and sleeping too much or too little, not eating well, losing interest in a usual routine, having little energy to do even pleasurable activities, postponing contact with others, and of course isolating.  Actually, if you have visited your area nursing home or senior living facilities, it is evident that there is an epidemic of loneliness among its residents.

On the flip side, not only do seniors isolate themselves when depressed, the truth is that they are isolated as a forgotten generation while the rest of the world stays busy with all its distractions.  Their isolation comes from within as well as in a large part, prompted by the reality of being left behind as an after-thought or one of the last “things to do” on their adult children’s “to do” list. Isolation is a daily reality for most seniors, and likely much more so with the COVID-19 virus.

As we all face being home-bound, missing our friends and those family members not living with us, isolated in a sense from normal living, let’s pause and empathize with those seniors that live like this as a matter of routine.  Reach out and connect.  Seniors need the support, comfort, and alliance during this difficult time.  They are a special generation of people with strong values and faith, hardy by history, and have been our leaders and role models for the generations after them.  They are next in line as the lost generation.  Let us respect, appreciate and value their worth, and keep them in your thoughts and prayers.  Now that life hurriedness has taken a stop with quarantine for most of us, let us take time and reflect on what really is important.  Reach out and virtually touch a senior, including those that are isolated as well as those more vulnerable and are especially dealing with heightened anxiety and depression.  If you were sitting in their seat, isn’t that what you would want?  

Claudia A. Liljegren, MSW, LICSW

Mental Health Professional