Reward Yourself: How to Become a Certified Nursing Assistant

How rewarding is your career?

Whether you’re just starting out or looking to change things up, it’s important to find something that keeps you motivated. You want a job that provides stability and offers the opportunity for advancement. And everyone deserves a career that makes them smile!

We just happen to know of a career that wraps all those things up into one, easily-obtainable package. Becoming a certified nursing assistant (CNA) means you can have a real impact on people’s lives. 

In this article, we’ll give you the scoop on how to become a CNA and why you need to do it now! 

What is a Certified Nursing Assistant?

CNAs are what make a nursing home run smoothly. They tackle the day-to-day needs of the residents. 

As a CNA, you’ll help residents take care of themselves by providing physical and emotional assistance. Typical duties include helping residents move around their rooms and the living center. This often includes bringing them to and from activities and therapy sessions. 

You’ll also help deliver meals, feed those who can’t feed themselves, and record daily food intakes. Many residents need help with basic hygiene, so you’ll help with bathing, brushing teeth, and brushing hair. You may also be in charge of preparing rooms for new admissions and resupplying the rooms of current residents. 

Plus, you’ll be there to answer resident questions and respond when they need help. It’s your job to make their days easier and more comfortable. 

Why YOU Should Consider Becoming One

There’s nothing more fulfilling than helping those in need. The nursing home residents depend on CNAs to help them live fuller lives. That makes your job one of the most important jobs on the planet!

You’ll get to see people recover from injuries and cheer them on as they reach their goals. You’ll hear about their lives, their children, their grandchildren. And you’ll learn to love the people you care for. It’s an incredibly rewarding experience!

Plus, there’s always a need for CNAs, so the job stability is second-to-none. And there’s plenty of room to move up in the field. 

Many CNAs continue their education and get a higher nursing degree. Working as a CNA gives you the real-world experience that other nursing candidates may not have. Plus, you’ll receive a full list of benefits including health insurance, dental insurance, and scholarships. 

Here’s How…

The best part about starting a career as a CNA is that it’s not a difficult field to get into. Start by enrolling in an approved nursing assistant course at a 2-year technical college. Alexandria Technical and Community College and Minnesota State Community and Technical College in Wadena are two local options. 

Programs like these will usually require a background check and tuberculosis skin test before you start. And you must be over the age of 16 with a valid ID card. The course takes about 84 hours to complete and will give you everything you need to become a successful CNA. 

At the end of the course, you’ll take your certification exam. The exam consists of a written exam with multiple-choice questions. This is followed by a skills exam where you’ll demonstrate the CNA skills you’ve learned in the training program. 

Another option is to take a test out challenge. This involves taking the test without completing the course beforehand. You’ll be able to review a handbook prior to the exam and take a practice exam online before you take the actual exam. 

Ready for a Rewarding Career? Become a CNA

Becoming a certified nursing assistant is one of the most rewarding decisions you can make. You’ll find that being a CNA offers you the job stability and growth potential you’re looking for. And you’ll have the opportunity to help others in the process. It’s a win-win scenario!

At St. William’s Living Center, we care about our employees. Visit our Career Page to learn more about all the opportunities available for your next career!

Chronic Pain

Can Childhood Trauma also be a Precursor to Adult Chronic Pain?



Several research studies indicate the relationship between childhood suffering and adult chronic pain. In fact, one study revealed that 73% of women with chronic pain also have experienced some childhood trauma (www.instituteforchronicpain.org/…/complications/trauma).  Woah!! – for those suffering from chronic pain, this likely draws your back hairs to stand straight up, shuddering at the notion that the pain “is not real.  Most of us have recognized that depression and anxiety are oftentimes results of chronic pain, or that pain is worsened when experiencing depression or anxiety based on a person’s thoughts about the pain.  However, to consider childhood trauma as an instigator for adult chronic pain is far-fetched for many that are suffering.

Truly, most of us know that much of chronic pain is due to a diagnosable anatomical cause, such as degenerative disc disease or spinal stenosis, or the result of physical trauma or accident, or genetic anomalies, or hereditary factors, and the list goes on.  However, diagnosticians note that more and more often, chronic pain has no clear anatomical cause or identified pain generator, as in tailed back surgery syndrome or chronic back pain. In such cases, specialists identify the pain is in itself to be the disease. However, this is not to say that there aren’t biological impacts of childhood adversity.

When we are threatened, our bodies have what is called a stress response, which prepares our bodies to fight or flee. However, when this response remains highly activated in a child for an extended period of time without the calming influence of a supportive parent or adult figure, toxic stress occurs and can damage crucial neural connections in the developing brain. Scientists also report that DNA is stored in every cell of the body and transferred from generation to generation. As mental and emotional levels are also stored by the cells, emotional imprints are left on the cellular memory by the traumatic incidents from the past.  Although every experience is not remembered by the conscious mind, the cells encode the memory of every experience.

Past negative experiences, personal beliefs and unresolved emotions create emotional blockages, suppressing and bottling up inside the person experiencing them. These emotional blockages perform as a defense mechanism in deep emotional pain produced during these traumatic or dysfunctional situations, resulting in physical manifestations like chronic pain, anxiety and depression.

www.health.harvard.edu/blog/chronicpainand-childhood

Specifically, it appears that children who have experienced one or more of the following 10 ACE (Adverse Childhood Experiences) descriptors, are much more likely to develop chronic pain as an adult.  These descriptors include: physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, mental illness of a household member, problematic drinking or alcoholism of a household member, illegal street or prescription drug use by a household member, divorce or separation of a parent, domestic violence towards a parent, incarceration of a household member, and death of an immediate family member.  The higher the score, the more chances these children will eventually have to deal with adult chronic pain.

The good news is that psychological care for those with a history of childhood trauma may help tame their overactive stress response, and in turn provide some complementary health benefits for those also dealing with physiological diseases.   As there is more and more concern about those addictive tendencies with pain medications, it is interesting to consider that possibly pain medications may be a band-aid for many. Maybe, a primary consideration for treatment is dealing with the root of the problem, working through the suffering of emotional pain as a child as well as an adult already dealing with chronic pain.

Claudia A. Liljegren, MSW, LICSW

St. Williams Mental Health



Conflict

Why Be in Combat When There is No War?

How often do you Draw your Weapon and are Ready to Fire, when there is no Battle?

In a non-war zone, such as in our home or community, we may find ourselves in battle against others, using the weapon of defense mechanisms against those we find unreasonably critical.  We may fear that our integrity is at stake when we feel unjustly judged by others and/or want to protect ourselves from someone else’s control. To make matters worse, when one responds with conflict by being defensive, the other oftentimes joins in and the battle ensues.  As the walls go up, the underlying reason for the argument becomes irrelevant as the focus turns to a matter of winning or losing.

Being protective of ourselves is a God-given trait, and we are hard-wired to defend ourselves when legitimately threatened (e.g., being chased by a bear, a break-in, etc.).  However, oftentimes we react to illegitimate threats and become defensive when, in fact, what is called for is being more open and forthcoming.

Conflict is normal.  It helps us communicate and work through issues so that reconnection can occur.  During a struggle, all of us at some time or other become unnecessarily defensive.   It becomes problematic when our defensive posturing remains stuck and we have a hard time letting it go, even when we realize what we are doing.  It can also become habitual, especially if there is that strong need to protect ourselves.

Our responses to criticism depend on several factors.  Some people struggle with disapproval by others due to brain chemistry or how their brain is wired.  They may have a nervous system that is over-sensitive and a temperament that reacts to perceived danger more readily. Some people refer to this as being “thin-skinned”.

Our childhood history also has a lot to do with how we respond to criticism.  If parents or caregivers oftentimes shamed their children and punished them harshly, it’s likely that, as an adult, their impulse is to quickly self-protect whenever they see someone upset and angry about something.

Regardless of the reason, self-esteem issues are a common thread that impacts our level of defensiveness in relationships.  With self-doubt comes either reactive defensiveness and belligerence or, the opposite, someone who takes on the role of a “people pleaser” to avoid any possible criticism.  Reactive defensiveness keeps people away and “People pleasures” don’t allow conflicts to occur, so honest communication is replaced by underlying resentment.

Relationships give us the opportunity to be more loving and accepting of one another.  Learning to hear the others’ complaints with curiosity and openness deepens our connection and puts away unnecessary defensiveness and any potential illegitimate war.

Claudia Liljegren, MSW, LICSW

Psychotherapist at St. Williams Mental Health program

Obstacles

Success is not to be Measured by the Position Someone has Reached in Life But the Obstacles he has Overcome

How do we get through some of the tough experiences in life’s journey?  We all go through challenging times, be it dealing with the death of someone close, having a serious illness, being separated from loved ones or feeling rejected, or losing a job and having financial restraints.  The list goes on…


Some tragedies allow for some preparedness while others are abrupt and unexpected, leaving us feeling punched in the gut or knocked down at the knees.  Some people have to endure a life full of misfortunes while others squeak by with only a few calamities along the way. The discrepancy for this is unknown, and answers to those “Why?” questions will likely not be known to us until we meet our Maker.  

Of course, most of us try to adapt to these life-changing events.  However, sometimes the burden is too much to bear. Oftentimes, “giving up” or not being able to “get up from off the floor” is influenced by the load by which we carry.  However, despite the level and degree of burden, it is also based on the character of the person. Here is another “Why?” question: Why are some able to “bounce back” while others remain overcome by the tragedy and are stuck in their own grief?  You may ask yourself what special personality traits are needed to get through these life’s battles., or how much can we actually recover on our own volition? It is interesting that those with a spiritual faith are much more likely to be resilient than those that don’t; another “Why?” question.

Resilience.  That’s the word.  Resilience is when you can change and adapt how you respond to a crisis or while in the face of tragedy.    It is about changing how you interpret and respond to the problem or circumstance. It is about challenging your thoughts and behaviors so that you create a more positive outlook.  It provides you with a pat on your back and encouraging words so that you will continue walking through the muck, believing that somehow, someday, you will get through all this and be better for it.  

Resilient people oftentimes have these suggestions, noted through the American Psychological Association in “The Road to Resilience”:

  • Make connections with others: Having close relationships with family and friends are very important and may be key to building resilience. Accepting help from other local groups are also very helpful during this difficult time
  • Avoid seeing crises as insurmountable problems:  You can’t change the crisis, but you can change how you manage it.  Look beyond the present to how future circumstances may be a bit better  
  • Accept that change as part of living.  Alter your goals to what you can attain and accept circumstances that you can’t.  
  • Move towards your goals:  Praise the subtle or small accomplishments you have made
  • Make decisions to problems and move in the direction you want to go rather than wishing they would go away
  • Look for opportunities for Self-Discovery:  Recognize your increased internal strengths and growth due to your ability to get through the hardships you have experienced
  • Nurture a positive view of self:  Develop increased confidence in your ability to solve problems and trust your instincts
  • Keep Things in Perspective:  Look at a broader framework and keep a long-term perspective of problems.  Avoid taking the situation out of proportion
  • Maintain a hopeful outlook:  Visualize what you want, rather than worrying about your fear
  • Take care of yourself:  Pay attention to your own needs and feelings.  Engage in activities you enjoy and find relaxing, Exercise regularly
  • Journaling:  Writing down your deepest thoughts and feels related to the trauma.  Meditation and spiritual practices oftentimes help people build connections and restore hope.

Actively participating in your life’s journey through resilience is so much better than responding with lingering vulnerability to the obstacles that come your way.  It may be a difficult task, but overcoming obstacles allows you to get up from off the floor.

Claudia A. Liljegren, MSW, LICSW

St. William’s Mental Health

Chronic Pain

How To Seek Treatment

Although there are lots of children, adolescents and adults who experience some type of mental health problem in their lives, they can oftentimes work through it with time and good support from others. However, if the symptoms linger and don’t improve or become more severe and it is impacting their ability to get through the day, getting professional help may be the next best course of action.

Warning signs for children and adolescents include slipping grades, difficulty getting along with other students or friends, getting into fights, having difficulty with authority figures, school absences, difficulty concentrating, isolating, fighting with family, difficulty controlling mood swings, thoughts of running away or wanting to die, substance abuse and much more. Children are more apt to show that they are struggling by acting out as they don’t necessarily have the ability to communicate what is wrong.

For adults, symptoms are similar but cater to those in the adult world. They can show their struggles through poor work performance, irregular attendance, problems with the boss, a bad attitude, moodiness or are easily offended on the job. Then there are those who have difficulty with increased/decreased sleeping and eating, racing thoughts or difficulty concentrating, motivational problems with uncompleted household tasks, increased relationship problems with family or friends, inability to leave the house or suffer with panic attacks, come up with blanks on positive thinking, feeling hopeless, helpless or worthless, getting in trouble with authorities or having anger problems, struggle with nightmares or flashbacks from previous trauma, and/or are abusing alcohol or other substances by trying to escape from emotional pain. There is a whole host of mental health issues that are not listed here but cause significant difficulty and impact the ability to function in our day-to-day routines. When there are problems getting through the day or a large part of our world is falling apart, it may be time to ask for professional help.

Oftentimes, those suffering from mental health problems visit their physician and discuss their concerns. Psychotropic medications may be considered if it appears that the patient would benefit from such. Oftentimes, physicians also refer patients to a mental health provider as medications may reduce symptoms but does not help the patient deal with the underlying problems that need resolve or teach coping skills. There are some insurance companies that require a physician referral for mental health services, but most don’t. Most insurances help pay for mental health treatment but it is a good idea to check with them about coverage. Individuals also seek mental health treatment on their own or self-refer, in addition to social workers, ministers, employers, family members or friends.

Usually, the initial stage of treatment is meeting with a mental health professional who can be found at nearly all mental health clinics. Usually, the mental health professional meets with the client and learns about the client’s symptoms as well as gains a well-rounded picture of the client’s situation and history. All information shared is confidential with very few exceptions of which the client will be made aware in privacy documents reviewed at intake.

Once the mental health professional has met with the client 1-2 times, they complete a Diagnostic Assessment, a summary of findings that includes treatment options most recommended for that individual. Mental health treatment encompasses a wide range of services based on need. For example, an individual may be recommended to receive psychotherapy in the office or outreach services in their home, if eligible. More intensive services are also offered if an individual is experiencing more serious symptoms, such as psychiatric consultation, case management, psychological testing, psychiatric hospitalization, crisis services, or other placements. The client is free to determine their level of involvement in the services recommended, unless they are at imminent risk of hurting themselves or others. A treatment plan is oftentimes devised in coordination with the client to reduce symptoms and improve their ability to function better in their life. Although it may be nerve-racking to disclose personal parts of yourself, it also helps to know that it is the beginning process of dealing with the problems that keep on interrupting your life. You don’t have to be an island. There is evidenced-based professional treatment that can help!

For more information please visit our mental health services page.

Claudia Liljegren, MSW, LICSW
Mental Health Professional
St. Williams Mental Health

Activities for Seniors: A Day in the Life of an Assisted Living Resident

Where will you live during your golden years?

Senior living is about so much more than location. It’s about finding a balance between community involvement and personal time. And finding a balance between the necessary level of care and the freedom to come and go as you please. 

If you’re looking into post-retirement living options, it’s time you consider assisted living! It’s a customizable option to find the balance you’re looking for.

In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the activities for seniors available at McCornell Court, St. William’s assisted living facility. And we’ll show you what a day in the life of an assisted living resident really looks like.

Morning Activities for Seniors

Breakfast is served! It is the most important meal of the day, after all. Start your day off right with a delicious breakfast in the facility’s community dining room. 

When you choose assisted living, cooking is optional. The dining hall offers lots of breakfast options to go with any diet. Get the morning meal you want without having to deal with groceries and kitchen clean up. 

And there’s always plenty of hot coffee! Get to know your neighbors while you enjoy mid-morning coffee in the common rooms. If you prefer to take your coffee alone, you can always have a cup outside on the patio. And during the winter, lounge in front of the fireplace with a good book. 

Physical activity is important to keep you aging gracefully. Walk off your breakfast by taking a stroll around the campus. Or work in the raised, community garden during the summer. In the winter months, try out the fitness center instead. And if you’re not quite as mobile as you used to be, you can opt to have outpatient physical therapy on site. 

Not only can you get physical therapy, but you can also arrange to have medical visits at the assisted living facility. Schedule your eye doctor or your podiatry appointment on site. You can even have lab work done or have your dental checkup done right here.

Relax or Ramp-up Your Mid-Day

At St. Williams, there’s always something to do. You’ll receive a copy of the activities calendar every month. Plan ahead or go with the flow! 

Invite your family to have lunch with you in the dining hall. There’s plenty of room to entertain even the largest families. Then, after lunch, head out to the afternoon activity in the nursing home next door. 

Afternoon activities include bingo, dice games, and trivia. Join in for the community happy hour. Or visit the salon for a manicure.

Of course, you can always choose to take it easy. The best part about assisted living is that home is always just a few steps away. Opt for an activity one day and a nap the next day. The choice is yours!

An Evening to Remember

Every evening, the dining hall serves a soup and salad bar to go with your meal. Eat early then head out of the campus to watch the high school football game. 

We offer bus outings to many of the local community events as well. Enjoy live music at the hall. Or sign up for the evening boat ride. 

If you’re not big on social events, choose to stay at home. Because you’re living in your own apartment, you can stay up as late as you like. Whether you’re “early to bed, early to rise” or a true night owl, assisted living offers you flexibility in your sleep schedule

Assisted Living: The Golden Ticket to Your Golden Years!

Assisted living offers you a living situation that’s as unique as you are. At McCornell Court, we offer plenty of activities for seniors. So there’s always something to do or someone to talk to.

We offer a customizable level of care that changes as you do. Let us take care of the mundane aspects of life like housekeeping, cooking, and lawn maintenance. Enjoy your golden years.

Contact us today to learn about all the services we offer at St. William’s Living Center and McCornell Court!